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Help With Family,
Finances And The Future

Sibling rivalry might appear after the death of a parent

| Mar 7, 2019 | Probate Litigation

There are many things that might lead to discontent when the final wishes of a deceased loved one are read. Some heirs might think that the will is unfair, which can cause problems with the individuals who are still living. When this occurs, trying to figure out ways to cope with the situation is a challenge.

Some people think that they are going to receive more than what they ultimately do. This is what may spark the problem. For example, if one child cares for an ailing parent in a way that takes up quite a bit of their time, they might think that they should have a larger share of the estate than the children who didn’t provide any care. This is likely not how the will is set up, so these caregivers might think that they are being given the short end of the stick.

When the people involved in the situation are siblings, old rivalries might come up. This can make it even more difficult to handle because they are also dealing with the death of a parent. At this point, everyone involved should review their own emotions and try to find the underlying causes for those. Seeking out professional help might help with this.

Because of the possibility that things might be contentious after their death, parents should make sure that the estate plan is clear. It is a good idea to discuss the terms with the heirs, so they have time to discuss the matter. Ideally, parents will compensate children who are caregivers before the parent passes away so that the terms of will can remain fairly equal between all siblings.

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