Jump to Navigation

Contact Our Firm

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Office Locations

Law Offices of Nancy M. Rice
1236 Brace Road, Suite F
Cherry Hill, NJ 08034
Phone: 856-673-0048
Fax: 856-673-0052
Map and Directions

Linwood Office
Linwood Professional Plaza
2021 New Road, Unit #9
Linwood, NJ 08021
Phone: 609-398-3447
Fax: 856-673-0052
Map and Directions

2014| South Jersey's Most Influential Law Firms | SNJ BUSINESS PEOPLE| readers' choice
Subscribe to This Blog's Feed FindLaw Network

Adding digital assets to a New Jersey resident's estate plan

It is the beginning of a new year, and that tends to make New Jersey residents sit back and take stock of their lives. For many people, this means either updating or creating an estate plan. One aspect of estate planning that many people tend to forget is what will happen to any digital assets.

It may not seem like social media or online photo storage accounts are important enough to include in an estate plan, but without having access to them, a New Jersey resident's family could lose precious memories. Moreover, if the executor of an individual's estate is unaware of the existence of an account, it might not be dealt with as part of wrapping up a loved one's estate. Fortunately, the solution to this issue does not have to be complicated.

A simple list of all digital accounts with their login and password information can be put with other estate planning documents. Once this list is made, however, it needs to be updated on a regular basis since many people change their passwords, add accounts and delete others throughout the year. The beginning of the new year may be a good time to update such a list. Depending on an individual's preference, the list either can be printed out or stored somewhere online.

Regardless of how the list is kept, at least the executor of a person's estate should be aware of where it is kept. As the online world continues to expand, more people are enjoying the convenience of going paperless. However, it may not be as convenient for the surviving family in the event of death. Therefore, it is important to include a road map of digital assets with an estate plan -- especially until the law catches up with the technological advances people enjoy.

Source: hcplive.com, "This New Year, Don't Forget Your Digital Estate", David Walters, Dec. 31, 2014

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information